Communities magazine #180 - Networking CommunitiesCommunities magazine – Life in Cooperative Culture

Communities magazine is the primary resource for information, stories, and ideas about intentional communities—including urban co-ops, cohousing groups, ecovillages, and rural communes.

Communities also focuses on creating and enhancing community in the workplace, in nonprofit or activist organizations, and in neighborhoods.

We explore the joys and challenges of cooperation in its many dimensions, and pass the wisdom on to you and your community.

 

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Upcoming Communities magazine themes

Winter 2018, Issue #181: The Culture of Intentional Community

Spring 2019, Issue #182: Community Land

 

Articles from recent issues (and the current issue) of Communities:

Liberation, Networks, and Community

Posted on September 21, 2018 by
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Movements and networks of liberation show us that community can be a tool either of oppression or of powerful organizing for liberation. It’s time for our movement to get solidly on the right side of history.


On the Potential for an IC Business Network

Posted on September 14, 2018 by
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Research and data strongly suggest that a network of intentional community businesses could fill a real need for both customers and business owners.


Connect: Now More Than Ever

Posted on September 7, 2018 by
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Time spent at Lost Valley and La’akea inspires a passion not just for community and its heart-opening, communication-deepening, earth-connecting effects, but also for communal networking and the difference it can make in the world.


Call for Articles – Community Land

Posted on September 4, 2018 by
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Would you like to write for Communities? We are now seeking submissions to Communities magazine for issue #182, “Community Land.” You are cordially invited to send submissions including articles, photographs, poems, graphic artwork, etc. The issue will be out in March 2019. Please send us your article idea as soon as you can, before writing/submitting a… Read More


Communities of Intention in Peru, Ecuador, and Beyond: A Summer of Travel and Rediscovering Communal Roots

Posted on August 27, 2018 by
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As a college project, a child of intentional community explores how others define community, discovering that organic community spaces are possible everywhere.


Leading Edges of Collaboration: GENNA Alliance

Posted on August 26, 2018 by
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Six key networking organizations come together to serve the regenerative communities movement by forming GENNA, the North American branch of the Global Ecovillage Network.


Answering the “Call of the Mountain” through a Spiralling Network of Sustainability

Posted on August 25, 2018 by
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Organizing a networking gathering yields many benefits, but the collatoral trials and tributions take their toll on this organizer—now recharging by prioritizing farm and family.


Notes from the Editor: Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Posted on August 24, 2018 by
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It’s still possible to make it a beautiful day in the neighborhood.


Networking Communities, #180 Contents and Free/By Donation Digital Download

Posted on August 23, 2018 by
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Just as no person is an island, no intentional community is an island. ICs are connected to other communities and cooperative groups locally, regionally, nationally, internationally—whether those connections are actively cultivated or simply present in shared participation in a cooperative experience. Intentional cultivation of those ties—the fostering of networks—can make each participant group stronger and more resilient. In Communities’ “Networking Communities” issue (Fall 2018, #180), authors share their journeys in exploring and creating networks—among communitarians, among communities, even among networks of communities and among communities researchers. They discuss the joys and benefits as well as trials and tribulations of organizing networking gatherings, of attempting to address social justice, ecological, and related challenges through collective visioning and action, of working toward an equitable and regenerative future in concert with others, of exploring the edges of cultural evolution, of learning from others’ experiences as well as their own. They talk about the potential of further networking to help us create the future we want to see. We hope you’ll draw helpful information, inspiration, and insight from their stories. Once again, the issue is available via free/by donation digital download at ic.org/communities.


Remembering Zendik: Mating in Captivity

Posted on August 2, 2018 by
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Helen Zuman’s debut book describes in detail her six-year-long involvement with a radical intentional community that also fits many people’s definition of “cult.”


The Concrete Thinking of Hobbits

Posted on July 27, 2018 by
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What makes Maitreya Mountain Village’s multi-functional Hobbit Hole so eco-friendly is that it’s constructed of concrete. Yes, you read that right.


From Blight to Beautiful: Renovating an Urban House By and For Community

Posted on July 20, 2018 by
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An overgrown lot with a dilapidated house transforms into an urban permaculture oasis thanks to the efforts of the Bread and Roses Collective in Syracuse, New York.


A High-Performance Building for Cohousing: From Vision to Move-In

Posted on July 13, 2018 by
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So you want to design, build, and live in community in the most ecologically positive building that can be built? After a decade-long pursuit of that goal, a co-creator of Capitol Hill Urban Cohousing recounts lessons learned along the way.


Good Neighbours with Earth: Using natural building materials in community-scale construction

Posted on June 29, 2018 by
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Earthsong Eco-Neighbourhood offers their mistakes, successes, and learnings in the hope of encouraging the wider use of natural building materials and systems in cohousing projects.


Eco-Building at the Ecovillage (I Have Built a Home)

Posted on June 22, 2018 by
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At Earthaven Ecovillage, the experience of planning, building, working with others, and living in the sensual, earthy “Leela”—part temple, part hideaway—proves to be a dream come true.