Systemic Consensus Principle

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Systemic Consensus Principle

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The systemic consensus principle is a decision making process for groups. It aims at reaching sustainable and conflict free solutions. The idea is to look at as many proposals as possible in order to find the one which evokes the least resistance. This is then the solution which is the nearest to consensus.

Contents

Simple summary of the process

The first step is for the members of the group to „brainstorm“ and come up with as many possible solutions as possible, without, at first, judging them.

Then the proposed solutions are evaluated and judged by each person. Each person gives each proposal from zero to ten „W“ points (W is for Widerstand = Resistance) . 0 points is complete acceptance of the proposal, 10 points is the maximum resistance to the proposal.

The „W“ points are then added together to calculate where there is the maximum and minimum resistance to the proposals. This is the so-called „group resistance“.

The proposal with the minimum resistance is the proposal which comes nearest to consensus.

The developers

The systemic consensus principle has been developed by Erich Visotschnig and Siegfried Schrotta, two ex-IBM system analysts in Austria. They began to develop new, self-managed decision making processes at the start of the nineteen eighties, and from 2001 began to develop the present method. They have written two books about the process (German language) and offer training courses and seminars through the International – Institut für Systemisches Konsensieren (ISYKONSENS).

External Link

ISYKONSENS Homepage (German)

Online Resource

„Decision Making Without Conflict“ Video (English)

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